Cliffs of Dover – Expert


Slashbot can shred with the best of them! Here’s a video of our robot playing “Cliffs of Dover” on Expert difficulty. Final score: 96%. Not too bad for a machine.

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18 comments so far

  1. Andrew on

    I understand the concept of not modifying the actual guitar. But I think you’ll only achieve perfection by using relays to directly connect the electronics inside the guitar instead of using actuators to press the buttons. This holds true especially for the strumming.

    Just a thought. 🙂

    I’ve taken apart my guitar, and based on your electronics and images I think you could even fit all your electronics completely inside the guitar, and put a USB port out the side of it. Or make it into another cool shape or casing. For example put the electronics inside a small speaker cabinet, or inside a large guitar pedal. Just seems such a ridiculous waste to go towards automation by emulating what a human would do.

    Or perhaps take the final step and do something similar to those automated pianos. Completely jump the electronics, but then make more electronics which move/play the guitar from the inside. 🙂 That would be quite a spectacle.

    Cheers from Germany! Nice project!

  2. Nick F on

    Found you guys on Engadget, and I have to say amazing job guys!

    Just a thought, but have you considered modifying the strum bar activator to strum up and down somehow? Speaking as someone who hasn’t moved past single strumming yet, I can say that the strum bar tends to register an extra hit when it pops back up (breaking streaks).

    Great job, nonetheless! It’s a great piece of work and I look forward to any future updates 😀

  3. Greg Baz on

    Great project. I wanted to do this but have no skills in robotics or programming. Glad to see someone did it. I see how making a robot is more fun then just relays. But I think it would help to use relays connected directly to the guitar PCB to determine where the errors come from. There are so many variables – fret board deflection, strummer misses, ext. Using relays would let you know if it is software or mechanical causing the missed notes.

  4. Jon Finklestein on

    Gr8 jorb you guyz, but nest tine keep teh schatter a little less ok thx bai

  5. Mike L on

    Great Job guys!! Fantastic!! Keep up the great work, I can’t wait to see what Slashbot will be able to do next! I agree with Greg Baz in that a connection straight to the guitar PCB may get you closer to the golden 100% mark. It wouldn’t be as cool as the real GH guitar of course; but getting 100% on expert in any song would make a great video 🙂

  6. tim on

    I totally disagree with the guys above. I think you absolutely should stay external to the guitar. That’s the whole point, right? You’ve created a robot that “sees” the notes and then plays the guitar ( fantastic job, btw ). It would almost seem like cheating if you just hacked straight into the guitar.

    More to the point — if you did everything in software and plugged into the guitar then this wouldn’t be a robotics/electronics project, now would it? 🙂 Let the CS majors do it, they don’t have anything better to do anyways, LOL

  7. James on

    Very impressive work. I’m curious why you used relays to drive the solenoids rather than transistors? I think you could eliminate some lag if you replaced the relays.

    FTAC 2002

  8. Cakemeister on

    I enjoyed your video. Nice job! I also agree with keeping the guitar totally intact.

    I wonder if you have experimented with trying to tell the difference between a HOPO note and a regular strummed note.

    I can see you’ll have some problems on songs such as Misirlou where alt-strumming is required unless you add a second strumming actuator on the other side of the guitar. It probably wouldn’t be difficult to implement.

    I also noticed you have problems with sustains.

    Good luck getting 5 stars! I’d give y’all an A!

    Gig ’em!

  9. Cakemeister on

    I enjoyed your video. Nice job! I also agree with keeping the guitar totally intact.

    I wonder if you have experimented with trying to tell the difference between a HOPO note and a regular strummed note.

    I can see you’ll have some problems on songs such as Misirlou where alt-strumming is required unless you add a second strumming actuator on the other side of the guitar. It probably wouldn’t be difficult to implement.

    I also noticed you have problems with sustains.

    Good luck getting 5 stars! I’d give y’all an A!

    Gig ’em!

  10. Guitar-Player on

    Thank You ! 🙂

  11. Robert M. on

    Keep up the good work Ags. Glad to know the College of Engineers continues to put out the best and brightest out in the industry.
    Gig Em
    Robert

  12. Hawke on

    Question: What did you mean by the robot doesn’t like that board?

  13. slashbot on

    Hawke-

    We were referring to the fretboard on which the notes appear. Each character in the game has a different pattern on their fretboard. Since we are monitoring the color brightness to detect notes, a fretboard that contains bright colors may throw off our system. It may detect something on the fretboard as a note and attempt to “play” it.

  14. mdekoker on

    Great job! Keep up the good work!

  15. EMPAPTIPT on

    How’s life ?!

    Am fairly new to this forum and just wanted to introduce myself and say “hello”.

    Laters…

    Athena
    ~ Video Production Service

  16. Guitar-Instructions on

    One of a Kind

  17. buyout music on

    Keep it up man
    That’s great

  18. Clint Rowley on

    Very unique, awesome work!


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